I Hate People Who Take the Elevator

A friend of mine made an off handed comment the other day. “I’m sick of lazy people taking the elevator!” To say that I was taken aback would be an understatement. I pushed him a bit, and he simply said he hated that everyone did it, that it was an engrained social structure, that obesity was an epidemic, and that it was a waste of energy.

I think it’s time to review both fatphobia and ableism 101, as well as how they’re intertwined. The first thing to note about something like whether other people take the elevator or not is that it’s none of your damned business because you know nothing about this random other person and their behavior isn’t hurting you (we’ll get to questions of obesity soon). There is nothing morally wrong about not wanting to be active right this instant. And in many cases, someone might be incapable of taking the stairs: some people have invisible diseases, and your assumption that everyone should take the stairs is part of the underlying cultural norm that other people’s bodies belong to us and they all have to be able and thin or they are doing something wrong. They are causing harm.

There are a lot of things wrong with the assumption that you should be able to tell someone else what to do with their body or that it’s any of your business what someone else does with their body, whether that’s how/when they have sex or their choice of diet and exercise. The moment we start deciding what the correct way for another person to treat their body is, the moment we’ve decided to try to take away their basic autonomy.  Everyone has the right to decide what to eat, how to move, where to go, and when you assume that their actions are fair game for your shame and criticism because you don’t like what someone else is doing, you’re implying that someone else’s body is public property. And that’s just really uncool.

There is nothing wrong with being fat. Spoiler alert: it is entirely possible to be healthy, happy, and active while being fat. The Health at Every Size movement has a great deal of information on this, but suffice it to say that genetics plays a huge role in your size, and that body composition makes a large difference. The “obesity epidemic” is based on the BMI scale, which does not take body composition into account at all and reduces many complex health problems down to “you’re a fatty, lose some weight,”. As this article points out, fat people often have to fight for the right to be able to eat food. Relatedly, they also often have to fight for the right to be inactive or rest. Any time we see an overweight person sitting down or watching TV or taking the elevator, we assume they’re lazy. We don’t do that with thin people, even though there’s not any law that says the thin person is more active than the fat person.

We tend to only accept a fat person as a “good fatty” if we see that they only eat salad or take the stairs every time. Fat people are by default considered unhealthy and lazy until they have proven that they do all the correct healthy behaviors and are still fat. Many people assume that if a fat person is engaging in any “unhealthy” behaviors, those behaviors are what has caused them to be fat (and thus a drain on society because all fat people are the worst ya know). Never mind that some people are fat because of disabilities.  Never mind that you literally have no idea whether or not that individual just came from the gym or not. Never mind that you have literally no evidence that taking the elevator is what caused this person to be overweight or whether or not this overweight person is unhealthy. Never mind that some people physically can’t take the stairs, even if they look able bodied.

It’s none of your damned business what anyone does with their body, what food they eat, and how they exercise. Bodies are complicated, and unless you’re someone’s doctor or intimately close to them, you don’t know even close to enough to make a judgment about whether or not they’re lazy. A lot of this is straight out concern trolling, and there’s good evidence that it’s not really about health in the fact that I don’t see any of these concern trolls telling me that they have a right to tell me to eat more and deal with my eating disorder because insurance! Public health! You need to be able to work! They’re not concerned with the state of my health and body because I am thin and able bodied and sometimes I rock climb and swing dance for hours. You cannot read someone’s health off of their body.

Maybe taking the elevator is an engrained social structure, and maybe we could do more to promote exercise. But any fat person or depressed person or sick person can tell you that they’ve heard it. They’ve heard it a thousand times. One more piece of shame is not going to help (it may actually make people fatter). There are more positive and more helpful ways to promote movement. I take the elevator because the stairs take longer and are boring. I’d rather exercise in a more fun fashion. So maybe that “just take the stairs” approach is alienating some people, and is actually an excuse to complain about fat, lazy people.

Yes, maybe it is more energy efficient to take the stairs. But we all make trade offs in our lives in terms of values and priorities, and how we treat our bodies is incredibly personal. If it’s so important to you, then take the stairs yourself, but stop haranguing others when you have no idea what their lives are like.

 

3 thoughts on “I Hate People Who Take the Elevator

  1. ubi dubium says:

    I have an old knee injury that has left it weaker than the other one. So I usually have to take the stairs leading with the other leg, one step at a time, which slows everybody else down. So I tend to take the elevator when it’s available. I exercise in other ways, mostly walking, but stairs are really just not the best exercise for me right now. But the people like your friend carping about “lazy people” wouldn’t know that, unless they got stuck behind me on a long flight of stairs. Then they’d probably gripe about how “you slow people should go use the elevator and get out of our way!”

  2. Ryan says:

    I didn’t read your whole article….but i work in an office building with 4 floors….we have an extremely high obesity rate…over 50%. People constantly complain about how fat they are….how bad they feel…yet they eat awful and i rarely see them outside for walks or taking the stairs. Are you telling me all the 1500 people here have a knee or other injuinjuries that ineable them to walk the stairs? yes there body is their own….but how can you disrespect your body this much and take it for granted. It has been proven in so many studies that a little bit of excersize is so vital to fending off disease and your overall well being. Start small…walk 2 flights of stairs every day….help yourself. Yes your body is your own but you do have friends that care about you and family that cares for you….and do you think they want you to die 30 years early or live with debilitating body pain because you didn’t exercise. Our body’s were not ment to sit 10 hours a day…get out and move and your life will be much better….and never give up!

    • oj27 says:

      Ya know if you’re going to comment it really is just good manners to read the article.
      Because the point is it’s none of your business and you have no idea what someone’s life and background are like. The point is there are 1000 tiny reasons that people feel overwhelmed or incapable of walking up four flights of stairs (holy shit, I’m skinny and in shape and I wouldn’t be able to do it). The point is that no one owes you health. The point is that duh everyone knows they’re supposed to exercise and fat people already feel shame so it doesn’t help to throw guilt at people.
      But that’s ok, you can just keep assuming that there’s something horribly wrong with everyone you work with. I’m sure it makes you a great coworker.

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